Beautiful Bruny

The barge to Bruny Island leaves from Kettering a pretty seaside town.

It was sunny when we got on the ferry and 20 mins later when we arrived it was cloudy.

This didn’t spoil our experience. It’s a big island with a combination of sealed and dirt roads.

There are houses scattered around the rolling hills leading down to a variety of bays.

Assorted letter boxes

There are very few shops and businesses. This is the way the 600 permanent residents prefer it. They want solitude not progress.

There are lots of little boats in the more sheltered bays.

We tried to stop for coffee but the Cheese Company we planned on visiting has decided to close Tuesday Wednesday. Due to covid and visitors not coming especially in the cooler months.

We did stop at the honey company and enjoyed a tasting. Leatherwood is my favourite though the fennel honey was quite different and delicious.

We crossed the narrow belt of land know as The Neck. It’s a great place to climb to the lookout for a view of the whole area. It was windy the higher we climbed.

You can see from the photo above the island and the route we were driving. We crossed the Neck to south Bruny and continued onto Alonnah Bay. There were more houses scattered along the bay , the Bruny Hotel and a general store. Yes we finally got some coffee.

This blue man was standing in a field and was made by the local men’s shed to highlight depression suffered by many farmers. The accompanying notes outlined how to recognise symptoms and how to help someone.

The small community have set up a number of street libraries and art work. Such a great idea.

We passed the Bruny Island Winery and decided that would be the perfect spot for lunch. After Cloudy Bay.

On the way we pass a resourceful local with an open garden.

Cloudy Bay has a lookout with great views

We enjoyed a lovely lunch at the vineyard. And purchased some of their wines to take to Bicheno.

The lighthouse was next. So remote and one of the four oldest lighthouses in Tasmania. In the museum there was a story of one of the earliest lighthouse keepers who was there for 36 years and had 12 children. His poor wife! How difficult life would have been.

We climbed the steep hill to the lighthouse. Along the way passing more of the pretty wildflowers we seem to see all over Tasmania.

Luckily we had Stephens four wheel drive. We were able to cross the small mountain along dirt road to the last bay we wanted to visit.

Adventure Bay is where Capt Cook landed 1773 during his second journey.

We particularly liked this area. The beach is lovely and the houses a flat walk across to the sand. And lovely views.

It was back onto the barge, a drive back to Sandy Bay to our friends and out for a fish & chips dinner. Beautiful scallops and baked flounder.

The seafood in Tasmania is great.