Pichi Richi Train in Quorn

My last post for this trip is about another train journey. This time a step back in time.

In 1878, construction commenced on the Port Augusta and Government Gums Railway. The line was extended to Oodnadatta in 1891 and further to Alice Springs in 1929, establishing an important rail link to Central Australia.

The famous Ghan passenger train travelled this way from 1923 to 1956, and on the northern part of this route until 1980. Such a pity the Ghan doesn’t stop here now ut would be a great place to break the journey.

This historic train bring back the romance of train travel, as it was in its heyday a century ago. The name “Pichi Richi” came from the section of track between Port Augusta and Quorn, through the Pichi Richi Pass, which was first opened back in 1879.

During the war years this was a major junction for trains carrying troops. At one point 43 trains came through a day. The local women would feed the men in the local hall during a break in the trip. Quorn would have been a bustling town.

So the train is old. Today it is run entirely by volunteers. And what a variety of train enthusiasts offer their services to keep this historic train ride operating.

David, one such enthusiast met us at our assigned carriage to clip our ticket and welcome us aboard.

David looked the part – covered in train badges

We settled into our bench seats with other train buffs on this sellout Sunday morning short run through the Pichi Richi pass to Woolshed Flats.

David gave us a run down on the train and it’s history, speaking faster than the train was moving !

He told us that the carriage we were in named Warana was the one Mel Gibson sat in for the scene for the movie Gallipoli.

Many movies have used Quorn and this train in their scenes. Gallipoli, The Shiralee, The Water Diviner, Wolf Creek, Sundowners, The Tourist, to name just a few.

It’s such a popular attraction people stop their cars by the side of the road to watch & wave to those on board. Today with the marathon on with runners having started in Port Augusta it was extra busy.

We moved through the countryside through the pass and arrived at Woolshed Flat. Here you disembark and have morning tea while the engine is detached and moved around, in a move to then put it at the front of the train. Great to watch.

The engine moving to the front of the train for its return journey.

We spent half an hour chatting to other train buffs watching the engine manoeuvres. Our driver, an 82 year old man is assisted by his son and his 18 year old grandson who shovelled the coal. Trains run in the family.

David welcomed us back on board for the return journey. Our fellow passengers had bonded over the journey. There were four sisters away for a weekend who were joking, laughing and having a ball. A few caravaners on holidays and a family with two little children. The two year old boy was hooked. He loved this Thomas the Tank engine experience.

If you are in this area do yourself a favour and do a Pichi Richi train trip. At $61 it was a great experience and the money goes directly to its maintenance.

Quorn SA. Train Paradise

Leaving Wilpena wanting more is a sign we have enjoyed our visit. I’d like to do some more of the walks.

We stopped at a few more lookouts with the view changing each time and always magnificent.

The drive back out to Hawker was quite different to the drive in few days ago. The morning light is so different on the hills surrounding us to the light in the afternoon.

A coffee stop at Hawker was a surprise. There is a big café opposite the information centre. It’s has the best coffee, quandong pies , meals and more. Well worth a visit. The cafe staff, Sev and Kads, itinerant workers from Wollongong were helpful and chatty about this great cafe.

Quorn is only an hour away along the straightest road – looking out at flat land. Years ago this proved too hard to grow anything on so there were a number of abandoned brick houses left by disappointed farmers.

Arriving in time for a heritage building walk it was interesting and sad. So many lovely old buildings many empty but almost in need of repair.

Lunch at the Quandong Cafe was terrific.

Quorn has a lot to offer and it would be good to see a bigger industry bring people to town to live and work. At the moment it is the Pichi Richi steam train that brings visitors to town. We’re going on it tomorrow.

I’m surprised the town looks so quiet. Not many people around today. There’s a marathon here tomorrow. It starts in Port Augusta. There will be lots of people around then. Accommodation was booked out, so we’re staying at a cabin about 10 mins from town. We tried to book at one of the hotels for dinner but had to go to the other hotel, The Austral. Bonus there is karaoke on.

Our little cabin at Pichi Richi Park is basic but comfortable and there’s a heater! We sat looking at the view reading the papers before heading back into town for silo light show.

What is a Silo Art show? Most country towns have large grain silos. They are like a big blank canvas. It’s been a trend in Australia for the silos to be painted. These Silos are heritage listed so can’t be painted So they project images onto the silos at sunset each night.

We arrived as the sun was setting. Tuned our radio to the station suggested for the audio and sat in our car and watched. It’s like being at the drive in movies.

We got our quandong ( a local treat) gin and tonic set up and sat back and enjoyed the show.

In fact they should show movies here. Perfect screen. The light show consisted of various different segments outlining the features and activities of a Quorn. a section on the food, the attractions, The indigenous history.

The streets were quiet except for those heading to the two hotels for dinner. It wasn’t quiet in the Austral Hotel. We sat near a big group of Marathon runners. The good part is they weren’t drinking much and finished early. But they were friendly and fun!

The bar staff ready for karaoke

The runners head off for bed and then the karaoke started. It’s always funny to watch this entertainment. Ordinary people get up and have a go . Good on them. But really. The choice of songs could be better for some!!!

Marg and I were not going to do it but it wasn’t long before we felt we could do better than most! But we’d resisted and ended up singing all the way back to our cabin.

What’s your favourite karaoke song?

Fabulous Flinders Ranges & Wilpena Pound.

Two chilly days in Adelaide and we were ready for a little more adventure.

We thought a few days in Wilpena Pound in the Flinders Ranges would be a perfect end to our Australian adventure.

Known for it ancient mountains, spectacular gorges and sheltered creeks Ikara National Park is one of the most spectacular parks in Australia. And there is a lot of competition!

All of this only 5 hours drive from Adelaide.

We set off early Thursday as we planned on visiting friends Kathy & Mark in the Clare Valley. They are house sitting – a new and rewarding experience since retiring.

On the way we stopped at Balaklava and lovely small town.

We drove through the vines of Clare and arrived at their house for the next few weeks. It’s charming & just outside the village of Clare. They look after ducks, chickens and dorper sheep. And are living in the comfortable old farm house.

House sitting is a great way to explore new areas – living rent free. Though it’s good if you like animals.

We headed off after lunch and headed west. We passed a few more little towns but couldn’t stop. We wanted to get to Wilpena before sundown.

This resort is joint owned b the SA Gov and the local Adnyamathanha Aboriginal people. They call the pound “Ikara” meaning “meeting place” or “place for initiations”.

We settled into our family room, had a glass of wine and planned our day tomorrow.

Dinner was soup in the restaurant which is part of the main resort building – built in 1947. it resembles a ski lodge!

We’re looking forward to exploring this area tomorrow. Driving in we were in awe of the beautiful mountains.

The Nullarbor- a Long and very Straight Track

A late night in Kalgoorlie led to an early start in Rawlinna.

Clickity clack Clickity clack. Our train clicked away during the night. It’s funny how during the day it seems so calm and the night time turns the train into a Rockin’ rollin’ adventure.

The sunrise over Rawlinna was gorgeous. Soft light makes the deserted town beautiful.

We were off the train by 6.30am. It was cold!

The only sign of life on the deserted platform was a horse. He stood patiently letting us pat him as our entertainer set up then played country & western.

We drank hot tea and ate bacon egg rolls as we sang along and wondered why we had got out of a cosy bed! But how could you miss this little piece of the Australian outback. Very special.

The more energetic of us stretched our legs walking along the deserted dirt road of this huge sheep station. I was hoping someone could fill us in on details about this sheep station on the edge of the Nullarbor. I have since found out it is more than 2.5 mil acres in size with 65,000 sheep!

Today it was us and a horse at the railway station.

Back on board we dived back under the doona as the sun came through the window.

Lunchtime came and gave us a chance to chat to our fellow travellers and make some connections. Cath thought she knew me but her husband said she thinks she knows everyone.

Sitting on the jailhouse rock.

A second stop at Cook. This place has a population of 4. There are a few houses there which get used by railway works from time to time. Someone has a good sense of humour. There were signs around the empty town including one our side as male and female jail. In between was the musical ‘jailhouse rock’.

Miranda said I reminded her of her mum who, like me, loves a red lipstick! Miranda is a nurse from Manchester who despite 20 years of living in Perth still has a strong accent. She’s talkative and funny – the kind of nurse who would keep you entertained but take no nonsense!

More cards in the afternoon before cocktail hour! Today I had a margarita and was surprised that Jill, who only ever has one half strength coffee a day, had an expresso martini. It had two full shots of coffee and 2 tablespoons of brown sugar. Jill was later seen dancing on tables!!!!

It was our last night together on holidays and we were celebrating our great trip. If you’ve missed out please go back and read the earlier blogs on the Gibb River Road.

We have travelled over 4,300 kilometres. Over dusty roads, had several boat trips, swum in at least 8 gorges and in the ocean 7 times, waded in a tunnel creek, had two light plane trips, one epic train trip, enjoyed wine, beer and cocktails. Eaten too many chips! Had lots of laughs and card games and really enjoyed our travel buddies Chris & Jill.

Dinner was delicious. Lamb shanks! No chips. Beautiful Moss Wood wine and lots of chat.

A great cickity clack sleep and an early arrival in Adelaide. Our lively lovely crew including Layla, Georgia. Nick ….. farewelled us. It’s been great.

We have a few days with Steve’s sister before heading off to Wilpena Pound – a little sight seeing and a ride on the Pichi Richi rail journey in Quorn.

Keep following readers…… Wilpena is known as the jewel in the Flinders Rangers

Clickity Clack: The Indian Pacific Train.

Pick up from our hotel in Fremantle is part of the Platinium service for the Indian Pacific. We are being spoiled on this trip! So naturally we’ve been looking forward to this train journey for quite some time.

We arrive at East Perth Station and are checked in with Layla a lovely young girl wearing an Akubra hat. We are in carriage I, cabin 4.

First sight of the train.

It’s 9 a.m. when we board the train and the Bollinger has been popped. People start to smile. The service team introduce themselves and the guests start to chat. It may be expensive but the treatment is first class.

Our cabin is small but perfectly laid out. Our comfy seats face the way the train will be going and every little convenience has been included.

The seats fold out to become the bed.

It’s not long before it lunch time. the food is lovely.

The menu cover.
A sample menu. I had the camel curry! It was delicious.

Of course lunch was a accompanied by another Bollinger or two. This was followed by a nap!

We met some fellow travellers. Miranda and Gavin from Perth are on board celebrating a birthday. They are lowering the average age and look like fun – enjoy a drink and a chat!

Val & Jim from Melbourne are lovely and we swapped lots of stories. There are other keen train enthusiasts who are on their 2nd, 3rd and even 4th journey – the Ghan north to south and the Indian Pacific east to west !

Some are travelling Premium because they no longer like climbing up to a bunk style bed. I can identify with that feeling.

Card playing had become our afternoon or evening activity and it has continued. Today we multi-tasked! There was a trivia competition hosted by the resident guitar-playing entertainer. We played cards, played trivia and drank Bollinger.

Tonight after dinner we arrived into Kalgoorlie around 9 p.m. We left the warmth of the train for a tour of cool Kalgoorlie with Katherine.

She drove through the dark streets pointing out sights we couldn’t see. She told us stories and used the word ‘actually ‘ more times than necessary. She’d had a long day and sounded exhausted. We were all thinking our Katherine needed to be home in bed.

First stop was a yard housing a small museum and theatre where two locals put on a play about the discovery of gold by Paddy and Tom. Unfortunately it needed a better script & better actors.

Next stop was the giant pit. We went to a viewing platform but with few lights on it was hard to see anything. The photos told the story of a pit that is 5 km long, 2 km wide and 1 km deep.

The whole tour was ‘actually’ underwhelming. It would have been more effective to have an audio on the bus. We should have listened to fellow travellers Miranda and Gavin who were staying on the train in their cabin with a glass of wine and a Netflix movie.

Couldn’t wait to get back to the train, have a warm shower and tumble into bed.

Fremantle: a village by the sea

Our stay in Fremantle was supposed to be warm. Was supposed to be spent with a ferry trip to Rottnest Island. A little swim.

The Esplanade Hotel

Weather has a way of changing things around. The ferry service is cancelled so we changed our plans.

Friday night we went to Nedlands for dinner with some old friends of Chris and Jill. We had a great night and some lovely soup. Not a chip in sight.

Saturday morning called for a sleep in. Our hotel – The Esplanade – is large and old and right near the old town on one side , the park and marina on the other.

We made our way, in the unaccustomed cool breeze, to the Moore and Moore Art space and cafe. There was a good watercolour exhibition on where we spent a few minutes before ordering breakfast.

It was the first cooked breakfast we’ve had so we all enjoyed tucking into eggs.

The streets are old and lined with lovely shops and cafes. Lots of bookshops and quirky shops like a map shop – where we lost Steve but all ended up enjoying. A gentleman’s shop with shoes and other accoutrements. A few galleries and our planned stop – the Palace Cinema.

Funny to go to the cinema on holidays but we thought it could be raining all day! We saw Maigret – about the French detective. It was slow and mysterious.

Coming out an hour or so later the skies were blue and the wind was blowing. We went browsing a little more and managed to do a little retail therapy. The streets had a Saturday buzz about them.

We saw the markets. It’s always good to walk through markets. These aren’t as big or colourful as the Adelaide Markets but it’s a good way to pass the time under cover while the rain poured outside.

Chris and Jill’s friends arrived at the hotel for afternoon tea. Sitting in the foyer is a good place to see people – both local and tourists. There was a Year 11 formal on so the young students were posing for photos, the boys looking dapper and the girls looking much older than their age – in beautiful long dresses.

Feeling a little peckish we headed up Essex St. to Nuncio. It’s a lovely Italian restaurant serving very good Italian food. The best Carnarvon scallops, prosciutto and pasta dishes.

I’d been told about Darling Darling – a whiskey bar nearby, so we braved the now very strong gusty winds and made our way past shops and restaurants.

Sadly there was a line to get in! We don’t do lines so back to our hotel for a nightcap. We have to reorganise our bags for tomorrows Indian Pacific journey.

Pity about the late night party in the room adjacent to ours where the group of people gathered on their verandah at around midnight and proceeded to party hard.

Not good for sleeping……. so I made a call to reception! It took awhile but they eventually settled down.

Cable Beach Club Resort

I’m getting behind in my blogging do this will be a picture diary of our day.

Up early for a swim
Umbrellas are set up on the water’s edge
Nippers is on. Big crowd
Shoes at the bottom of the stairs.
Courthouse Markets. Slowest coffee in the world!
Buying a book for our grandsons
The Museum tells the Broome stories
Sailmaking shed at the museum
Lunch at the Green Mango
Japanese Cemetery. So many lost their lives diving for pearls.
Our room at the Cable Beach Resort
Walking to the adults only pool
Loving this pool
Even better with a cocktail in hand
Sunset at Cable Beach
Happy at Zander’s restaurant on the beach

Last day on the Gibb.

I have made packing up after each stop easy . The secret is not too many clothes and keep everything handy on the top of the bag in the same position!

Our last day on the Gibb River Rd and we want to fit as much in as possible.

Talking to other travellers we decided we must detour and visit Windjana Gorge to see the crocodiles and to Dimalurru to visit Tunnel Creek.

Breakfast included making a simple sandwich for lunch as there is nothing between here and Derby. Not a shop or petrol station. Nothing.

As we are packing the car I got chatting to a lady filling her water containers. We compare trips and I told her we are disappointed to be missing our house boat stay at Horizontal Falls because of the jet boat accident.

She shocked me by telling me they were there and her husband was on the boat.

She went on to describe the horrific scene as the boat with many injured people limited back to the pontoon. Many women with fractures in their lower limbs. It sounded awful. No wonder they are not ready to reopen. The staff are all traumatised and needing time off.

We are thankful it wasn’t us on board & the woman I spoke with was always very grateful she didn’t want a jet boat experience that morning.

So off we went – an hour drive back to the Gibb Rd turned toward Derby and the half an hour later turned left to Windjana.

The park is beautiful. The limestone walls so impressive.

The approach to the Gorge is through a small tunnel of limestone walls. it’s like entering a magical world.

Out the other side and a peaceful walk along the river bank keeping an eye on the opposite bank. The crocodiles are lazing and sunning themselves. Lots of them.

About 7 crocs sunning

We walked along for about 15 mins. Such beautiful scenes.

Next stop Tunnel Creek. This place I remember being talked about because of a boy called Jandamarra. He was with his mob when they were captured. He escaped into the tunnel where the creek flows under the limestone hills. It was written as a children’s book years ago.

To get to the tunnels you need to climb and clamber over rocks. They are the most amazing colours: pinks, grey, blue even a greenish look.

Then a wade through water into the tunnels. Quite creepy. We looked out for the red eyes of the resident croc.

Lunch was a simple sandwich outside under the trees. We are so lucky with the weather warm but not too hot.

From here it was a short but fairly boring straight drive into Derby. We were told that it’s not the most exciting place to be and to be sure to lock up well. Didn’t sound too good!

Sunset at Derby pier

We arrived in time to see the town in the afternoon light. Everything looks good bathed in a glowing sky. Then to our hotel the Derby Lodge. Not a lot of good things to say about this hotel. Except pretty ordinary.

We crossed the road to the Spinifex Hotel for dinner and made an early night of it. It was a big day of driving.

In the morning we walked to the local CWA markets, an oasis and spent a very happy hour. Such nice people and the Boab nut coffee was great as were the donuts and the home made slices.

There was music provided by the Rusty Nails, and sitting under the shade of a tree chatting to other travellers was as usual very interesting.

We walked back to get the car and of course we two retired children librarians popped into the library .

A welcoming library in Derby
Mark Norval’s art work.

We’d been told to visit Norval Gallery and we are so glad we did. What an interesting story behind Mark Norval the owner. He and wife Mary went to Derby as young teachers and never left. He now has this wonderful art space where local aboriginal people are welcome to come and paint. He travelled to many of the communities along the Gibb River area and taught painting and encouraged painting and it’s really taken off. There are some wonderful people doing great work. Edna Dale and her daughter Petrina Bedord. I bought one I couldn’t resist.

With Edna Dale and my new painting.

We spent a long time chatting to Mark about his life & work in Derby. He is so kind. So understanding of the problems facing the indigenous youth.

He has mentored Edna Dale mother of 7 and her daughter Petrina an up and coming contemporary indigenous artist. Her grandfathers Jack Dale and Paddy Bedford were famous in their field of art. Watch out for her. She paints in a style to reflect stories of Windjana passed down to her.

Petrina was painting in the art shed while we were there. Lovely to watch.

We also bought some decorated boab seed pods – such beautiful work.

We left the gallery and continued on our way to the prison Boab tree. A very sad story about indigenous peoples imprisoned in the tree.

Onto Broome. We have an extra night here as our planned night in a houseboat at Horizontal Falls was cancelled.

Sunsets are spoken about here more than anywhere else – except maybe Santorini! So we set out to find it. After checking into the Oaks at Cable Beach we drove along the coast to the port.

Broome is also famous for its dinosaur footprints. We went dinosaur hunting. It took us to Roebuck Bay.

Notice the rock behind. It has a face!
The light was soft and gorgeous

We decided to head to the fishing club for a sundowner. It not well known to tourists. It’s where the locals head. I’d read about it and it turned out to be perfect. Casual and a beautiful setting. One glass of Prosecco led to another led to fish and chips.

And so a perfect start to Broome has begun.

Glamping at Mt Hart Wilderness Lodge

Sleeping under canvas is a great experience especially when it’s glamping and everything is set up.

Mt Hart Wilderness Lodge is an hour off the GRR. Lots of creeks to cross as we bump along. Chris prefers to drive as it helps his back to be holding onto the string wheel. At least that’s what he tells us!

Steve sits as co driver and sometimes in the afternoon sleeps on the job.

Breakfast was in the screened dinner area. Very rustic. Cereals and toast. No big fry up!

The chef had prepared a picnic lunch for us to take to Bells Gorge.

Back along the bumpy one hour drive turn back toward Mt Leopold Range. Half an hour later we turn left and head towards Bells Gorge. We pass Silent Grove and keep going.

The car park at Bells is full of dusty 4 wheel drives, vans, small tour buses. One caught our attention yesterday Manning River. It’s a big duel cab full of gear, a motorbike , a generator, various bits of equipment & it’s decorated with finger drawings in the dust. Very carefully done. Today the van is missing. Must be in the caravan park.

We start the track and it didn’t take long to get rocky. We’ve talked to other travelers about Bells. It sounds wonderful but it is described as tricky to get into.

We walked for about 2km into the gorge over rocks with about three water crossings. Little stepping stones across small creeks. We arrive at a series of ponds all swirling towards a ledge which becomes the waterfall. Stunning.

We walk across the sloping rock shelf up the side towards the top to look down on the water fall.

Decision time. Continue on over the pond up a steep set of rocks then over the top and down down down to the sloping rocks leading to the water.

I decided I would risk a slip and damage my arm – recovering from a bad break last Dec. I couldn’t go back to an arm in a sling.

So the others pressed on and I got into the pool closest to the edge if the waterfall. Careful not to go over the edge!

They took it slowly and arrived safely and we waved and took photos and I watched as they swam in the big pool of water towards the waterfall.

Steve, Jill & Chris in the lower pool

I know they were having fun. But so was I, pottering in the pools and watching people crossing over, slipping, helping each other and those returning from the bottom of the falls.

A satisfying afternoon. The others arrived back full of smiles and we walked back through the rocks to the top.

We sat under the trees eating our picnic lunch before heading back to the lodge two hours away.

Washing on, showers, bed rest and finally the bar opened. We were very dry and ready for a game of cards before dinner.

The gong called us and tonight the dinner was chicken and sticky date pudding. Beautifully presented and so tasty. We met the chef. He used to cook for miners but has been here at Mt Hart for seven years. It’s a feature for this place. I hope he stays on.

Yum. Steve’s sticky date pudding.

Our canvas tent called and we headed to bed. It’s slightly cooler tonight so sleeping will be easy.

And it was!

A Long and Dusty Road: the Gibb River

The morning was still and quiet. The horse riders had left for their jog through the countryside as we were having tea and planning our day.

Today we continue along the road everyone talks about. We’ve heard about the corrugations, the dust, the river crossing.

I think the our drivers Leyland Brothers are excited to get going

We leave and immediately get stuck behind a bus. Oh no more dust. But at the end of the 16 km into El Questro he turned right towards Kunanurra and we turned left towards Derby.

Todays drive us about 5 hours. Not that the distance is great. It’s the dusty bumpy road!

We planned a stop at Ellenbrae Station. The people here have cleverly put on a Devonshire Tea. Yes …….scones, jam and cream on the Gibb River Rd.

The turn off to their property is 5km. Yes 5km of anticipation along a very rough rough road. But then. There it is.

A green oasis is surrounded by red dusty grassy scrub.

The sign welcomes us and we make our way to the shed / cafe open to the lush green gardens scattered with tables and chairs under the trees.

There is plenty to look at as we wait for our Devonshire tea.

We’d love our grandsons here with us on this trip. So many things to do. Crocodile huntings, swimming in gorges, fishing, sandpits, rocks, machinery! Boy heaven.

We bumped along the GRR for another hour or two. Dust, mud holes, river crossings.

The Pentecost River was rocky and the tide was down. The Durack River was small and rocky.

The road into our overnight stay at Mt Elizabeth was both surprising and fun.

Our ensuite cabin was actually old miners donga’s now fitted with air con! Small and stuffy when we entered the aircon went in so we headed to the lush garden to enjoy the last of the afternoon We stayed there while drama unfolded. Jill wanted wifi internet. Not possible unless you pay. That still didn’t work so as Jill claimed she had something she needed to do had been so nice to the hostess Chantelle she whispered’ you can use the owner’s internet but don’t tell anyone and only for a few minutes!’

As it turned out it was lucky. We had an urgent email from our travel agent. Our Horizontal Falls trip and overnight stay on the houseboat is cancelled! There was a bad jet boat accident about a week ago. All trips were cancelled until 10. We were to go on the 11th but now it’s been put off until further We have been offered an extra night in Broome and flight up to Cape Leveque with a visit to the Pearl farm for lunch and a flight over the falls. We’ve taken that but we’re sad as we miss the night on the boat. We didn’t really mind missing the jet boat.

With drama over it’s time for a drink. Lucky we brought some as there is no alcohol on sale here. Time for dinner. It’s a shared table which gave us a chance to meet other travellers. Always a good idea as you meet some interesting people and get some great tips.

Next to us were two men marine engineers from Perth. They had worked in many interesting places overseas. They were on a big trip from aperture across the Nullarbor and then straight up the centre of Australia

.

Dinner was prepared by Patrice. Home style cooking. A big rissole with a green pepper sauce and a bowl of veggies. Delicious. First night I haven’t had fish. Dessert as well. Cream caramel. Needless to say the new managers of Mt Elizabeth Station are former restaurant owners. They are busy preparing the rooms. There are 8 with ensuite and the same with shared bathrooms. The rest is camping.

We went back to our donga to find a frog in the toilet, and the aircon didn’t work. Lucky there was a large window with screens as it would have been too cold with air con on in this small bedroom!

We were initially disappointed but it was clean, friendly with a good meal provided. A fine overnight stay on the Gibb RR. But not a place with waterholes and great walks.